TEA

3 Amazing Reasons to Add Tea to Your Life

Tea is an aromatic beverage created from the leaves of Camellia Sinensis. Originally used as a medicinal drink in China the earliest know evidence of tea drinking was uncovered in the mausoleum of Emperor Jing of Han in Xi’an. This indicates tea was drunk as early as the 2nd century BC.

Tea is divided into categories depending on how it is processed.

  • White                           Wilted and unoxidised
  • Yellow                          Unwilted and unoxidised and left to yellow
  • Green                          Unwilted and unoxidised
  • Oolong                        Wilted, bruised and partially oxidised
  • Black                            Wilted, sometimes crushed, and fully oxidised, sometimes referred to as red tea in China.
  • Post Fermented        Green tea that has been allowed to ferment/compost

Herbal tea refers to infusions made from herbs or fruit without the use of tea leaves. E.g Chamomile, rooibos, rosehip. They are often referred to as tisanes or herbal infusions.

Black tea has less of the flavonoids that give you good health than green tea. Why, because of the way in which they are processed. Green tea is steamed quickly to stop oxidation. Black tea leaves are crushed, torn, curled or rolled and oxidised before drying. The extra step degrades some of the flavonoids.

To remain fresh tea should be stored away from light and in a vacuum sealed container to reduce exposure to the air.

The health benefits of tea have long been known around the world but only recently have there been many scientific studies into whether or not these claims are true. The majority of studies are doe as metanalyses where studies are combined so that there are collectively more participants and therefore it is hoped that the outcomes are stronger and easier to discern.

Among the many benefits of tea are

  • Reduction in cardiovascular disease and stroke (1)
  • Reduction in liver disease (2)
  • Reduction in depression (3)

All of the studies indicate that the correlation is to the number of cups of tea you drink. That is the more you drink the stronger the correlation and the likelihood that the benefits will show up.

(1) AM J CLIN NUTR. 2013 DEC;98(6 SUPPL):1651S-1659S. DOI: 10.3945/AJCN.113.059345. EPUB 2013 OCT 30.TEA CONSUMPTION AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE RISK. ARAB L1, KHAN FLAM H.
(2) INT J CLIN EXP MED. 2015; 8(6): 8339–8346.PUBLISHED ONLINE 2015 JUN 15. PMCID: PMC4538013, 'THE EFFECT OF GREEN TEA INTAKE ON RISK OF LIVER DISEASE: A META ANALYSIS. " XUERU YIN,1 JIQIAO YANG,2 TONY LI,3 LIYAN SONG,4 TINGLU HAN,5 MEI YANG,1 HUIHUA LIAO,1 JIANJUN HE,1 AND XIAOZHU ZHONG1
 (3) AUST N Z J PSYCHIATRY. 2015 APR;49(4):334-45. DOI: 10.1177/0004867414567759. EPUB 2015 FEB 5. 'TEA CONSUMPTION AND THE RISK OF DEPRESSION: A META-ANALYSIS OF OBSERVATIONAL STUDIES. ' DONG X1, YANG C1, CAO S1, GAN Y1, SUN H1, GONG Y1, YANG H1, YIN X1, LU Z2.